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The Wild Meadow Near Lake Tahoe Opened Its Gates For Everyone To See Its Mind-blowing Beauty

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There is a secret garden near Lake Tahoe in California that hasn’t been yet visited. For a century it was hidden from visitors and no one could see its beauty. The trees and the mountains kept it secret and untouched for a long time. In that place, it grew a wild meadow, full of grass and flowers that are currently blooming.

Near this garden, there’s Lower Carpenter Valley which is home to endangered birds and rare plants. The meadow is watered by a creed and is full of bird songs, making it a “secret garden”.

The garden hasn’t been touched for hundreds of years and has become an attraction to people who usually came to ski or to hike near this region. Since it had time to develop its own ecosystem, the meadow has been a place where plant and animal life flourished. The place is filled with wildflowers that cover 1300 acres in the summer and a willow forest, which is also home to rare birds and the Lahontan

The place is filled with wildflowers that cover 1300 acres in the summer and a willow forest, which is also home to rare birds and the Lahontan Cutthroat trout, which can be found in the creek.The meadow also shelters carnivorous plants, such as the rare native sundew, attracting a lot of insects.

After the Nature Conservancy and the Truckee Donner Land Trust purchased 2 square miles at a price of $ 10.3 million from the Carpenter family, who owns the land. In mid-July, they added an area of 600 acres and the territory they own will be available for visitors in order to see and cherish the amazing wildlife, accompanied by a guide.

The whole area purchased by the partnership includes two-thirds of the meadow and half of it is 637 acres, going under the name Crabtree Canyon and it’s meant for hiking and biking.

Dogs, horses and motorized vehicles are not allowed to enter the property which is taken care of by seasonal caretakers. Until 2019 the partners who bought a piece of the land will build restrooms, viewpoints, trails and a parking area for the visitors. Then they will be able to access the area by foot or by mountain bikes.